Two Friends of Man: The Story of William Lloyd Garrison and Wendell Phillips and Their Relationship with Abraham Lincoln

Two Friends of Man: The Story of William Lloyd Garrison and Wendell Phillips and Their Relationship with Abraham Lincoln

Two Friends of Man: The Story of William Lloyd Garrison and Wendell Phillips and Their Relationship with Abraham Lincoln

Two Friends of Man: The Story of William Lloyd Garrison and Wendell Phillips and Their Relationship with Abraham Lincoln

Excerpt

A YOUNG printer named Isaac Knapp, with whom Garrison had struck up a friendship, had become editor and publisher of the Essex Courant . Knapp's predecessor had championed Jeffersonian democracy with scant financial success; the new editor steered an independent course, but did not find the new policy more rewarding. When Garrison would visit him he usually found him downcast and regretting his journalistic venture.

After concluding his apprenticeship, Garrison had gone to live at Martha Farnham's, but had remained on the Herald as a journeyman printer. He now proposed to his employer that he lend him the money to buy out friend Knapp. Allen was willing, and so, at the age of twenty, Garrison became an editor and publisher -- the youngest in the United States. He changed the name of the weekly to the Free Press , and thus announced his policy to the public:

As to the political course of the Free Press , it shall be in the widest extent of the term, independent . . . It shall be subservient to no party or body of men: and neither the craven fear of loss, nor the threats of the disappointed, nor the influence of power, shall ever awe one single opinion into silence.

The first issue contained so spirited a polemic concerning the State's long overdue claim against the Federal Government, for the defense of the Massachusetts coast during the war with England, that ten subscribers canceled their subscriptions. Garrison reported this together with the information that more than an equal number had been added to the list, which he confessed to be "unbecomingly stinted, considering the magnitude of the town." That he meant to spare neither friend nor foe became evident when John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died on July 4, 1826. Allen, forgetting that in the past he had been wont to refer to Jefferson as the "Great Lama of Infidelity," eulogized the dead statesman. His former apprentice . . .

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