Foreign Policy Analysis

Foreign Policy Analysis

Foreign Policy Analysis

Foreign Policy Analysis

Excerpt

Stanislas Estreicher, Rector of the University of Cracow, my teacher, used to size up books in a few sentences. He argued that a book must have what he called "a wit," a thesis, a description, something more -- difficult to be described -- but which gave to the book the character and made its sense. If he could not do this with the content of a book he cared little for it. In his opinion, it was lacking "something" -- or maybe it was confused. I found in my teaching experience, in university and college courses, that a course must have a purpose, objective sense, its "wit" -- similar to books. Stanislas Estreicher died in a German concentration camp in Saxenhausen -- a victim of Hitler's foreign policy, which he understood, and the dangers of which he anticipated.

He would certainly ask what this book is about, and expect a few sentences for answer. Firstly, it is an attempt to apply scientific thinking and concepts to foreign policy analysis, though we realize fully the limitations and limits of scientific method in study of human society. Secondly, it is a method of analysis and formulation of foreign policy; it suggests ways of attacking the problem. Foreign policy, in this approach, is viewed as a social process. In this social process three essential concepts are distinguished: 1) ideology -- and foreign policy objectives as part and result of the former; 2) factors as elements of power (such as economic, military, population, geographic, and other factors); 3) policies, as courses of action. Policies -- courses of action -- are determined by elements of power -- factors -- and released toward certain objectives.

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