Creation and Discovery: Essays in Criticism and Aesthetics

Creation and Discovery: Essays in Criticism and Aesthetics

Creation and Discovery: Essays in Criticism and Aesthetics

Creation and Discovery: Essays in Criticism and Aesthetics

Excerpt

My interest in aesthetics originally sprang from certain convictions which thirty-five years of study have confirmed and clarified. The first of these is that art is no mere adornment of human living or an activity the end of which is pleasure, or therapy, for which a substitute could easily be found, but an indispensable factor in making the animal man, into a human person. Another is that its proper use can be discovered by an analysis of the work of art as an embodiment of objective meanings and values. A third is that we cannot grasp the work of art objectively unless we bear in mind the act that creates it and the distinctive mode of experience that apprehends it. And still another is that the test of a satisfactory aesthetics is its adequacy to all of these factors taken together.

Early in my study I came to suspect that the word "expression," which is still the predominant notion employed in the analysis of . . .

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