Colonial Roots of Modern Brazil: Papers of the Newberry Library Conference

Colonial Roots of Modern Brazil: Papers of the Newberry Library Conference

Colonial Roots of Modern Brazil: Papers of the Newberry Library Conference

Colonial Roots of Modern Brazil: Papers of the Newberry Library Conference

Excerpt

Since the first International Colloquium on Luso-Brazilian Studies was held in Washington, D.C., in 1950, a number of scholarly meetings in the United States have considered inter alia the history of colonial Brazil, but the Newberry Conference (November 21-22, 1969) was the first to be devoted exclusively to that subject. Plans for such a conference were first discussed at a breakfast organized by Professor Lewis Hanke in Cambridge, Massachusetts, during the 1966 Luso-Brazilian Colloquium. On that occasion, several scholars indicated the desirability of such a conference, and Dr. Lawrence W. Towner, Director and Librarian of The Newberry Library in Chicago, the premier research center in the United States for the study of Luso-Brazilian history, expressed a strong interest in holding the conference at his institution. Early in 1967 a planning committee was formed, consisting of the late Dr. Howard F. Cline, then Director of the Hispanic Foundation of the Library of Congress, and Professors Hanke, Stuart B. Schwartz, Engel Sluiter, Stanley J. Stein, and Dauril Alden (chairman).

After considering various suggestions, some of which had to be rejected because of limitations of funds, the committee decided that the conference ought to bring together young, established, and senior Brazilianists who were particularly interested in Brazil's colonial experience. The planners hoped that the meeting would stimulate in the United States scholarly interest in research on Brazil's colonial past and that the papers written for the conference would be of interest to both Brazilianists and other students of Latin America. Although financial restrictions made it impossible to invite as many scholars from the United States and abroad as the committee wished, efforts were made to include a few eminent Brazilianists from abroad. The meeting was intended primarily for historians, but the committee decided to invite specialists in other fields whose work was particularly relevant to that of historians of colonial Brazil.

Instead of seeking papers from well-known Brazilianists, the committee chose to tap the talents of a promising group of young . . .

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