The Diaries of Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., 1943-1946

The Diaries of Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., 1943-1946

The Diaries of Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., 1943-1946

The Diaries of Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., 1943-1946

Excerpt

Such are the strange and fascinating twists of history that Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., an industrialist with only scant background in international relations, was thrust into the center of foreign policy making during one of the most critical periods in United States history. From September, 1943 to June, 1946, Stettinius served as undersecretary of state, secretary of state, and U.S. representative to the United Nations. While holding these posts, he played an important part in the negotiations which accompanied the triumph and ultimate breakdown of the Grand Alliance, and his work at Dumbarton Oaks, Yalta, and San Francisco, gives him solid claim to the title of architect of the United Nations.

Stettinius entered the world of diplomacy after a meteoric rise to the top echelons of American business. The son of Edward R. Stettinius, a leading industrialist and partner in the Wall Street financial house of J. P. Morgan & Company, and Judith Carrington, of an old and established Virginia family, he was born in Chicago in 1900. Along with his older brother and two sisters, he grew up in moderate wealth and moved freely through the top social circles of New York and Virginia, enjoying such elitist pastimes as polo and horseback riding.

The elder Stettinius sought the best education for his children, sending Edward Jr., to the prestigious Pomfret School in Connecticut, and later to the University of Virginia. Much to his father's disappointment, the young man did not achieve academic distinction in either place. He entered the . . .

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