Philosophy of Science

Philosophy of Science

Philosophy of Science

Philosophy of Science

Excerpt

Philosophy of science must be distinguished from the sociology and the psychology of science. We have not, therefore, included readings which concern the interrelationships between science and industry, technology, religion, or other cultural institutions, important as these interrelationships may be. Nor again do any of the selections enter upon those fascinating problems having to do with the psychology of the invention and discovery of theories and hypotheses in science. Mere familiarity with the biographies of scientists is sufficient to falsify some theories regarding the psychology of the scientific mind, e.g., the Baconian theory that scientists first gather data and then frame hypotheses, or the cruder versions of Pragmatism in accordance with which scentists are always stimulated by the urgency of some practical problem. But no such simple manner for exhaustively confirming a theory is available: this requires careful formulation of the theory to begin with, and then refined techniques for testing it. And these are matters best left to the trained psychologist. Similar considerations pertain to the sociology of science. In the end sociology and psychology are parts of science itself; and it is not the task of philosophy to engage in casual speculations regarding questions which science alone can answer.

It is, however, one recognized task of philosophy to analyze the nature and structure of knowledge; and it is science, considered as as body of knowledge, which, it is hoped . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.