English Rule in Gascony, 1199-1295: With Special Reference to the Towns

English Rule in Gascony, 1199-1295: With Special Reference to the Towns

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English Rule in Gascony, 1199-1295: With Special Reference to the Towns

English Rule in Gascony, 1199-1295: With Special Reference to the Towns

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The latter part of the twelfth century witnessed the rise of the house of Anjou to a position of great outward splendor and widely extended dominion. By a series of fortunate marriages, inheritances and conquests Henry II became the ruler not only of England but of a large part of France. During his lifetime and that of his son Richard, this empire resisted all the efforts of the Capetians for its destruction. In the reign of John, however, it gave way. Gaining a pretext under the feudal law, Philip Augustus declared John to have forfeited all his French fiefs and forthwith set about the task of dispossessing him of them. In no long time John had been driven out of all his northern possessions; but in the south he was successful in resisting the French monarch's advance. Neither side had, therefore, been entirely successful. The English king had lost the north and the French king had not gained the south. For more than fifty years following the death of John each side made vain attempts to realize its entire ambition, yet the situation remained substantially the same; the English king could not regain the northern fiefs, nor could the French expel the English from the south. At length in 1259 Louis IX accepted these results and signed a treaty recognizing the continued sovereignty of the English king in Gascony.

At first sight it might seem that the territories which the Plantagenets retained were those on which they had the weakest hold. Normandy had been united with the English crown much . . .

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