Ovid's Metamorphoses (Books I-II-III-IV-V) in English Blank Verse Published together with Ovid's Metamorphoses in European Culture (Books I-II-III-IV-V)

Ovid's Metamorphoses (Books I-II-III-IV-V) in English Blank Verse Published together with Ovid's Metamorphoses in European Culture (Books I-II-III-IV-V)

Ovid's Metamorphoses (Books I-II-III-IV-V) in English Blank Verse Published together with Ovid's Metamorphoses in European Culture (Books I-II-III-IV-V)

Ovid's Metamorphoses (Books I-II-III-IV-V) in English Blank Verse Published together with Ovid's Metamorphoses in European Culture (Books I-II-III-IV-V)

Excerpt

Ovid Metamorphoses belongs among the few masterpieces which have aroused wide and enthusiastic interest in all civilized nations of Europe and through nineteen centuries of western culture. At all times Ovid's work has charmed men by its varied and imaginative narrative, its beautiful and animated style. But each generation which has read this favorite book has judged it from a somewhat different point of view and has found somewhat different excellences to admire. And in each successive generation Ovid's poem has acquired a richer interest because new poets and artists read it with delight and drew inspiration for the great work of their own time.

For every century the Metamorphoses has a different charm. An interpretation which conveys its meaning admirably to the men of one century may be obsolete for those of the next. In all the chief countries of modern Europe successive translations have been necessary, each presenting Ovid's masterpiece in the form best suited to contemporary taste. In the English speaking world this has been particularly true. The centuries of Shakespeare, of Milton, of Pope, and of Tennyson each admired Ovid Metamorphoses from its own point of view. In the first three of these great centuries there appeared successively the three famous poetical versions of Golding, Sandys, and Garth. And in the nineteenth century there appeared the accurate but less influential Victorian translations of King in verse and Riley in prose.

The twentieth century, too, admires Ovid Metamorphoses, but in a still different way. Translations which delighted earlier centuries no longer meet the requirements of modern times. In some degree these have been met by Mr. F. J. Miller's accurate and elegant prose translation for the Loeb Classical Library. But the plan of this work still leaves much to be desired. It does not attempt to reproduce the poetic effect of Ovid's verse or to do more than suggest in the briefest . . .

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