Problems of the Pacific, 1929: Proceedings of the Third Conference of the Institute of Pacific Relations, Nara and Kyoto, Japan, October 23 to November 9, 1929

Problems of the Pacific, 1929: Proceedings of the Third Conference of the Institute of Pacific Relations, Nara and Kyoto, Japan, October 23 to November 9, 1929

Problems of the Pacific, 1929: Proceedings of the Third Conference of the Institute of Pacific Relations, Nara and Kyoto, Japan, October 23 to November 9, 1929

Problems of the Pacific, 1929: Proceedings of the Third Conference of the Institute of Pacific Relations, Nara and Kyoto, Japan, October 23 to November 9, 1929

Excerpt

This book is a record of the chief discussions, with data material relevant thereto, of the third biennial conference of the Institute of Pacific Relations which took place at Kyoto, Japan, from October 28th to November 9th, 1929.

The record does not attempt to be exhaustive. A comprehensive report including the principal documentary material would extend into a series of many volumes. The task of the editor has been to present a picture of the main trends of discussion in the conference round-tables. He has digested these discussions and arranged the material in a historic setting with reference both to the discussions at former Institute conferences and to general developments in the field in question since the last conference.

The significance of the Kyoto conference is due to the fact that it was not an isolated event. It was part of a developing process and the embodiment of a living spirit. The Institute of Pacific Relations is the product of a new age which has reduced time and space as factors in international relations, which has changed our greatest ocean from a barrier to a bridge, has universalized the laboratory and popularized education. It is moreover an age in which the peoples of the Pacific have become the masters of their own destinies and the arbiters of the conditions and laws which control their international relations.

The Institute of Pacific Relations is a spontaneous movement. There is a Botent logic in the time and manner of its appearing. The international machinery by which nations have been dealing with one another since the beginning of history has been evolved on the assumption of the inevitability of war; of the necessity of force as the means for adjusting their differences. From this has sprung the school of secret diplomacy with its inevitable code of reticence and the withholding of facts. This technique to be effective requires the dominance of the few; the acquiescence and ignorance of the many. Since 1918, however, a different international technique has appeared. This is born of a new vision of human relations, based upon the concept of the rights of the weak, international interdependence, the power of facts, the intelligence of the people and their participation in government. The Institute of Pacific Relations has emerged as a part of the mechanism which the era provides for meeting its new requirements.

The Institute is a regional movement. It has come forward because of the new Pacific era and the special requirements of the peoples of the Pacific area. The conditions under which this era is developing and the problems of its peoples in dealing with one another are unique in modern history. While . . .

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