From D-Day through Victory in Europe: The Eye-Witness Story as Told by War Correspondents on the Air

From D-Day through Victory in Europe: The Eye-Witness Story as Told by War Correspondents on the Air

From D-Day through Victory in Europe: The Eye-Witness Story as Told by War Correspondents on the Air

From D-Day through Victory in Europe: The Eye-Witness Story as Told by War Correspondents on the Air

Excerpt

IF, ON MONDAY, JUNE 5, 1944, any one of the 2000 people of CBS and its affiliated stations already in the armed forces knew when D-Day was coming they kept it a proper military secret. It was no secret that some day there would be an invasion, but when was anybody's guess. Significant little variations in the routine of broadcasting began to occur. Each time this happened it twisted the tension a little tighter, until finally there just didn't seem to be any stretch left in it.

Along in late February, Paul White, head of CBS news, had sent a memorandum to his broadcasters, saying:

". . . Keep an informative, unexcited demeanor at
the microphone. . . . Give sources. . . . Don't risk
accuracy for the sake of a beat. . . . Use care in
your choice of words. Don't say 'German defenses
were pulverized.' Say 'German defenses were hard
hit.' . . . When you don't know, say so. Locutions
like 'Allied troops were believed to be progressing,
etc.' are out. Rather say 'Nothing has been released
during the past 24 hours, etc.' . . . Exaggeration
and immoderate language breed dangerous opti
mism. . . . Respect the listener's trust. Remember . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.