The Four Cornerstones of Peace

The Four Cornerstones of Peace

The Four Cornerstones of Peace

The Four Cornerstones of Peace

Excerpt

In the turbulent years ahead, many of us may ponder the last words of Socrates when, after his condemnation to death by the judges of Athens, he said: "The hour of departure has arrived, and we go our ways--I to die, and you to live. Which is better God only knows."

Terrible as the sufferings inflicted by war on millions of men, women and children have been, the problems of those who live to take part in the tasks of post-war reconstruction will be an even greater test of courage, vision, and the capacity to work together for the common good. The ashes of Stalingrad and Warsaw, of Rotterdam and Cologne, of Cassino and Manila have not yet been cleared away; yet already new animosities and fresh distrust loom among nations who were expected to continue into the days of peace the cooperation they had achieved in time of war. As British Foreign Secretary Eden said at San Francisco, there is a job of work to be done in achieving peace.

Security: Our Primary Task

What is the primary task that awaits us as we clear up the débris of war? The primary task of the United Nations is to answer the question that is haunting men and women everywhere--the question of how to achieve security now that hostilities are over. This is a twofold task. People want to have security at home, against the specter of unemployment that stalked all lands during the inter-war years; and . . .

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