Galapagos, World's End

Galapagos, World's End

Galapagos, World's End

Galapagos, World's End

Excerpt

This volume might well be called Six Thousand Minutes on the Galápagos, for of the two and a half months' duration of the trip, less than one hundred hours were spent actually on the islands themselves. Although this brief expedition, to one of the least visited corners of the earth, was conceived and achieved in such record time, yet every hope was consummated, every expectation realized. First and last, the credit belongs to Harrison Williams, who initiated and financed the whole trip, and then to the twelve members of my party who made possible all that we accomplished during the limited time at our disposal.

We left New York on the steam yacht Noma on March 1st, 1923, and returned on May 16th. During the trip we steamed a total distance of nine thousand miles, and crossed the equator eight times. Besides the Galápagos we touched at Charleston, Key West, Havana, Colon, and Panama.

The Galápagos Archipelago is a tiny group of about sixty islands and islets, directly on the equator, in the Pacific, five hundred miles off the coast of Ecuador, to which country they belong. When I realized that our stay must be measured by hours, I knew that little could be gained by forced marches into the interior of the larger islands. Even expeditions which had spent a year or more here, had failed to penetrate to the central craters. The smaller islets--mere specks on the largest charts--revealed themselves as of infinite variety and . . .

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