That Damn Y: A Record of Overseas Service

That Damn Y: A Record of Overseas Service

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That Damn Y: A Record of Overseas Service

That Damn Y: A Record of Overseas Service

Read FREE!

Excerpt

This book, seemingly, ought to begin with a personal statement. What was I doing dans cette galère ?

Every American, more or less, must have longed to go to France for years before we entered the war. And when, at last, we stopped playing safe, stopped shivering on the brink, took the plunge and lined up like men with the rest of civilization swimming for its life, that longing turned into a bitter ache.

Yet, non-combatants, male or female, had no sort of right to go--to cumber the ships, to eat the food, to take up room in France, unless they were sure in advance of doing a real job. And, for a while, no real job showed a convincing head above my horizon.

Then came an opening--in the form of a cable from the head of the Overseas Y, in Paris, asking me and a friend of mine to come over, the one to do executive work, the other to let the American public know in print how the Overseas Y was using American trust money.

This request was not based on personal knowledge, for the head of the Overseas Y knew neither of us two women; but rather on a report of similar work that we had done in times past.

But, now that my dream had come true, the fact is that I regarded its embodiment with a particularly wry disfavor.

"Y.M.C.A.!" I growled. "I never went inside one in my . . .

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