Indonesia's Economic Stabilization and Development

Indonesia's Economic Stabilization and Development

Indonesia's Economic Stabilization and Development

Indonesia's Economic Stabilization and Development

Excerpt

The fate of Indonesia is of obvious importance to the Western world. Indonesia is a large country: superimposed on a map of the United States, Indonesia's 3,000 islands stretch far into the oceans on either side, and from Canada to mid-Texas. Even when only land masses are included, the area of Indonesia is about equal to the United States east of the Mississippi. With some eighty-three million people, it is the sixth biggest country in the world in terms of population. Its position in Southeast Asia, stretching from a point opposite the northern tip of Malaya almost to the northern tip of Australia, makes it a bridge from continental Asia to Australia--a fact that was made abundantly clear in the course of World War II. It has a variety of strategic products: rubber, petroleum, tin, bauxite, copra, quinine and others. With its abundant water power, mineral resources and high level of native skills, Indonesia is potentially an important industrial nation.

Indonesia became a sovereign state in December 1949 after ten years of war and revolution. For three centuries before that it was a Dutch colony. This historical background plays a basic role in shaping current policies. Through its colonial . . .

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