The Iliad of Homer

The Iliad of Homer

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The Iliad of Homer

The Iliad of Homer

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Modern criticism throws doubt upon the old theory that the blind poet Homer was the author of the Iliad. It is generally conceded, however, that Homer began the story of "the wrath of Achilles." But later bards probably added song after song in praise of the heroes of the Trojan War, until, about the eighth century B.C., the Iliad finally assumed its present proportion and content. It gives us a stirring picture of the life of the times and offers an excellent exposition of the civilization of the ancient Greeks. Every line of this poem is instinct with the directness, simplicity, and freedom of the primitive people concerned in the tale. As we read, we breathe the freshness of that early world, we enter into the spirit of the age, we live and move and have our being with the heroes on the shore before the city or within the walls of Troy. Such is the power of the poetic genius that inspired the Homeric "tale of Troy divine."

THE TRANSLATION

"Homer, in truth," says Andrew Lang, "is to be matched only with Shakespeare.... He is a poet of gold universal as humanity, simple as childhood, musical now as the flow of his own rivers, now as the heavy plunging wave of his own Ocean." Homer is, indeed, "not of an age, but for all time." The Iliad and the Odyssey have been read in all ages by all peoples and in all languages. They are a permanent world-possession . . .

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