Independent African: John Chilembwe and the Origins, Setting, and Significance of the Nyasaland Native Rising of 1915

Independent African: John Chilembwe and the Origins, Setting, and Significance of the Nyasaland Native Rising of 1915

Independent African: John Chilembwe and the Origins, Setting, and Significance of the Nyasaland Native Rising of 1915

Independent African: John Chilembwe and the Origins, Setting, and Significance of the Nyasaland Native Rising of 1915

Excerpt

No book is entirely the work of one or even two pairs of hands. This book, in particular, owes more to the help of others than its authors can adequately express.

To the Edinburgh University Press for its encouragement, advice, and generous assistance we are especially indebted.

The Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland, with that generosity which is sometimes taken too much for granted, provided a guarantee towards the cost of publication of this book. We must also acknowledge gratefully the contributions of the Carnegie Trust and the University of Glasgow which promoted field trips to Nyasaland and the Yao country of Tanganyika, some of the material from which has been used in this work.

To the Earl of Moray Fund for the Promotion of Original Research University of Edinburgh, for grants which have made possible the photographing of a number of documents, we must express our gratitude.

Our thanks are due to the following: Thomas Nelson and Sons, Ltd., for permission to quote from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyrighted 1946 and 1952; the Universities' Mission to Central Africa for permission to quote from Central Africa, 1916 and 1917; the Hogarth Press, Ltd., for permission to quote from Norman Leys, Kenya (London, 1924) ; Routledge and Kegan Paul, Ltd., for permission to quote from Jessie Monteath Currie, The Hill of Goodbye (London, 1920), and from Lucy Mair, Native Policies in Africa (London, 1936); Chatto and Windus, Ltd., for permission to quote from SirHarry Johnston, The Man Who Did the Right Thing (London, 1921); the Stirling Tract Enterprise for permission to quote from Emily Booth Langworthy, This Africa Was Mine (Stirling, 1952) ; Oxford University Press for permission to quote from The Empire at War, volume iv (London, 1924); William Blackwood and Sons, Ltd., for permission to quote from L. S. Norman , 'Rebellion', Blackwood's Magazine, 1931; the New Statesman for permission to quote from SirHarry Johnston, 'The Bitter Cry of the Educated African', New Statesman, 1916; Hodder and Stoughton, Ltd., for permission to quote from SirHector Duff . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.