East African Chiefs: A Study of Political Development in Some Uganda and Tanganyika Tribes

East African Chiefs: A Study of Political Development in Some Uganda and Tanganyika Tribes

East African Chiefs: A Study of Political Development in Some Uganda and Tanganyika Tribes

East African Chiefs: A Study of Political Development in Some Uganda and Tanganyika Tribes

Excerpt

One of the most intractable problems facing East African Governments is the business of selecting and training the officials who make up the core of their local administrations, that is to say, the administrative systems of individual tribes or groups of tribes and their various territorial sub-divisions. Within each tribe law and order is maintained, cases are judged, taxes collected and agricultural and health measures enforced by traditional authorities who have been given new functions under the British Administration. These different authorities vary in type. They include kings with long lines of descent, princes, local rulers appointed to special posts by their king or by the British Government, clan elders and district or village headmen, the latter often selected on the basis of hereditary descent. Among the Bantu peoples of East Africa the traditional authorities are often arranged in elaborate hierarchies of office and supported by councils of different types. In British Africa all these authorities, however diverse, are described as 'chiefs'. Kings usually become 'paramount chiefs' in Tanganyika, and their subordinate territorial rulers 'county', 'sub-county' or 'parish' chiefs, or authorities of the first, second and third order. In the kingdoms of south Uganda the territorial rulers keep their old titles as, for instance, the Kabaka of Buganda, or the Mukama of Bunyoro, and under them there are territorial administrators also known as 'chiefs'--'county', sub-county' and 'parish' chiefs. The higher chiefs include men with a secondary and even occasionally a university education, and these live as near to the European style as they can manage, preside over modern offices with clerks, accountants and a system of records, and drive round their districts by car. The lower chiefs, on the other hand, live in . . .

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