Victim Compensation: Economic, Legal, and Political Aspects

Victim Compensation: Economic, Legal, and Political Aspects

Victim Compensation: Economic, Legal, and Political Aspects

Victim Compensation: Economic, Legal, and Political Aspects

Excerpt

The idea of governmental compensation for the victims of crime first came to my attention about five years ago. At first, like many ideas, the effects of victim compensation appeared to be straightforward and to promote equitable outcomes. Several nonobvious consequences of victim compensation were pointed out to me by Professor Gordon Tullock at the Center for Study of Public Choice at Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Professor Tullock's initial criticism was responsible for forcing me to think more carefully about this topic, which eventually became my doctoral dissertation at Virginia Polytechnic Institute. A number of others at VPI, especially Professor Richard Wagner, my committee chairman, and Professors James M. Buchanan, M.M. Ott, and W. Mark Crain, were helpful in my research.

The present version of this research has been greatly modified by my post- doctoral legal and economic training at the Law and Economics Center of the University of Miami School of Law. A number of individuals at the Law and Economics Center, especially Kenneth W. Clarkson, Louis De Alessi, and James S. Mofsky, have helped me in thinking about this topic. The John M. Olin Foundation is due thanks for financial support during my stay at the Law and Economics Center.

Roger E. Meiners

John M. Olin Fellow Law and Economics Center Coral Gables, Florida . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.