From Beethoven to Shostakovich: The Psychology of the Composing Process

From Beethoven to Shostakovich: The Psychology of the Composing Process

From Beethoven to Shostakovich: The Psychology of the Composing Process

From Beethoven to Shostakovich: The Psychology of the Composing Process

Excerpt

THE AVERAGE. music lover, listening to one of the great music works, does not give a thought to how these compositions may have originated.

He enjoys their grand musical constructions, the symphonies, sonatas, chamber music, songs and choruses. He derives pleasure from the tonal beauty and from the musical expression and feels his whole being elevated, his sensual powers augmented and his entire personality transformed.

The world in which he ordinarily moves, and which is the scene of his activity, seems to vanish. He feels himself transplanted to another world wherein everything that would normally catch his interest ceases to exist: his work, his human relations, his worries and hopes and fears, his plans and his everyday sentiments.

In this new and exalted world there are only sounding forms, and within the tones only the lustre of beauty; a lustre that has always been sensed by all susceptible individuals (by some more clearly than by others) as a light coming from a loftier region.

Even those who seek in the enjoyment of music merely the sensual pleasure of sounds, still sense in music firm order and a lawful form which elevate the simplest melody far above the tumult of everyday life.

The attitude of musical audiences in the concert hall demonstrates most effectively the transformation of a . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.