Bolivia: the Uncompleted Revolution

Bolivia: the Uncompleted Revolution

Bolivia: the Uncompleted Revolution

Bolivia: the Uncompleted Revolution

Excerpt

A revolution is not an event but a process of varying duration and outcome. As I conceive it, a completed revolution (not all are completed) involves a movement from one authoritative political order, through a period when political order is in question, to a new authoritative political order. Thus, in a sense, a completed revolution is analogous to a story with a beginning, a middle, and an end.

One task of the observer of any specific revolution is to look back and unravel its plot. The task of building a theory of revolution is to seek a basic theme upon which the plots of specific revolutions are variations. In this study, I shall attempt to delineate the plot of the Bolivian Revolution of 1952 as it has been enacted thus far (it is my contention that the revolution has yet to be completed) and, hopefully, to grasp at least a part of the theme which ties it to a wider set of phenomena.

One problem in undertaking a case study of revolution such as this is that a generally agreed-upon definition of the concept does not exist. In attempting to come to a usable definitional concept of revolution, I follow those who argue that revolution should be viewed as a species of "internal war." According to Eckstein, "The term internal war denotes any resort to violence within a political order to change its constitution, rulers or policies." In . . .

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