Khrushchev: A Political Portrait

Khrushchev: A Political Portrait

Khrushchev: A Political Portrait

Khrushchev: A Political Portrait

Excerpt

Great is the power of memory, a deep and boundless manifoldness; and this thing is the mind, and this am I myself.

--ST. AUGUSTINE.

Today's voyager, crossing continents and oceans by jet, is easily trapped into thinking that all men are alike, that the world has become small, that it has become one, that we are all citizens of the world. But this is an illusion. There is as yet no citizen of the world; the earth is still very large, and it stubbornly refuses to yield its secrets to any one man.

Khrushchev was born in Russia. Countries which are not our own are called strange countries, and people born and raised there, strangers. Strange means foreign, but it also means baffling, mysterious, improbable, hard to understand. Language is always right, and the words "strange" and "stranger," with their double meaning, are never more accurate than in the case of Russia and Khrushchev. Khrushchev is indeed a stranger. And Russia is indeed a strange country. It is also vast, very complex, and very old. Even the origin of its name is uncertain.

Russia's history began around the seventh century, when the Eastern Slavs, the ancestors of the Russians, settled, in what is today the Ukraine, in the southwest of the Soviet Union. Three centuries later the city of Kiev began to flourish, with furs, hides, honey, wax, and slaves its articles of trade. In a long-

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