The Independent Monologue in Latin American Theater: A Primary Bibliography with Selective Secondary Sources

The Independent Monologue in Latin American Theater: A Primary Bibliography with Selective Secondary Sources

The Independent Monologue in Latin American Theater: A Primary Bibliography with Selective Secondary Sources

The Independent Monologue in Latin American Theater: A Primary Bibliography with Selective Secondary Sources

Synopsis

Following an outline history of the monologue as an independent genre in the theater of Latin America, this bibliography incorporates all published and unpublished, staged and unstaged monologue pieces written in Latin America. The bibliographical entries are grouped in three chronological periods reflecting the fundamentally distinct nature of the monolgue during each of its periods of development. Within each grouping, the plays are listed alphabetically by author under an alphabetical roster of country headings. Each playwright's years of birth and death are given, if known, as well as the country of origin if that differs from the geographical category into which the dramatist has been placed. All known editions of the monologues are included. For unpublished works, an abbreviated reference source is given. Each title is followed by the generic description applied to the work by the author or publisher, or by reviewers or historians in the case of unpublished pieces. The secondary bibliography lists works which deal with the monologue as a literary genre.

Excerpt

The dramatization of conflict within the individual human mind is the oldest and most basic form of drama. The theatricalization of this conflict has a long and varied history in the literary and cultural traditions of Latin America. The monologue emerged during colonial times in the form of laudatory prologues or introductions known as loas in Spanish America and elogios dramáticos in Brazil. It developed as an independent genre during the period of struggle for political independence under the name of teatro unipersonal or melólogo. Designated as monologue, it was given new life and became extremely popular as the nineteenth century gave way to the current one, with literally hundreds of short monologue afterpieces being composed for favorite actors and actresses. During the last four decades, the mono- theater has again experienced a new and unparalleled surge of vitality in the form of autonomous monodramas which incorporate a variety of techniques designed to allow the spectator to more directly approach the inner workings of the mind of the character on stage, and unipersonal espectáculos and collages which provide a forum for the display of variety and virtuosity in talent by celebrated actresses and actors. Indeed, except for a few relatively brief interludes of abatement, the monologue has constituted a perennial and vital form since the inception of the theater in Latin America. Yet, in spite of the longevity and present vigor of the genre, extremely little critical attention has been paid to it. This bibliography aspires to enhance the feasibility of such study, to heighten awareness of the vitality of the theater in Latin America, and to provide scholars, researchers, theater directors, actors, actresses, and other interested individuals with a useful reference tool.

While this bibliography aspires to incorporate all independent monologue pieces written in Spanish and Portuguese from the inception of theater in Latin America to the present, the author recognizes that such cannot be the case even though virtually all available material even tangentially related to Latin American theater was consulted, visits were made to theater libraries with substantial holdings, and contact was established with numerous playwrights and critics. The ephemeral nature of the genre under scrutiny has allowed many monologues of earlier periods to disappear without notice or publication. The current profusion of the genre has also undoubtedly resulted in the recent . . .

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