Great Lakes Basin: A Symposium Presented at the Chicago Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 29-30 December, 1959

Great Lakes Basin: A Symposium Presented at the Chicago Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 29-30 December, 1959

Great Lakes Basin: A Symposium Presented at the Chicago Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 29-30 December, 1959

Great Lakes Basin: A Symposium Presented at the Chicago Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 29-30 December, 1959

Excerpt

The natural features of the Great Lakes Basin have long attracted the interest of scientists and engineers, from whom have come many distinguished contributions. The importance of the Basin in the affairs of men has long been recognized in all quarters of the North American continent and abroad.

In recent years there has been a marked increase in the active and vigorous investigation of a prodigious variety of problems in the Great Lakes Basin. Investigations in some areas are now on the threshold of important discoveries because of the opportunities afforded by the combination of painstakingly accumulated knowledge acquired over many years and the availability of new techniques. Needs and problems arising from the activities of man provide challenges which help to stimulate curiosity; some of the social and economic problems cannot be solved without first achieving significant technical advances.

During the past decade, students of Great Lakes problems have assembled in a variety of productive meetings, including (1) the sessions on The Natural Setting and Engineering Problems of the Great Lakes, Chicago, 1952, sponsored by the American Geophysical Union and the American Meteorological Society, and offered as part of the 1952 Centennial of Engineering; (2) the Fourth Conference on Coastal Engineering, Chicago, 1953 sponsored by the Council on Wave Research of the University of California, the Technological Institute of Northwestern University, the Society of Water Engineers, the Illinois Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers, and the Illinois Institute of Technology; (3) the four conferences on Great Lakes research (biological, chemical, geological, physical, etc.) sponsored by the Great Lakes Research Division of the Institute of Science and Technology of the University of Michigan (and the Division's predecessor, the Great Lakes Research Institute); (4) the several meetings of the Great Lakes Institute (formerly the Great Lakes Geophysical Research Group), which has its head-

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