Queer Theory in Education

Queer Theory in Education

Queer Theory in Education

Queer Theory in Education

Synopsis

Theoretical studies in curriculum have begun to move into cultural studies--one vibrant and increasingly visible sector of which is queer theory. Queer Theory in Education brings together the most prominent and promising scholars in the field of education--primarily but not exclusively in curriculum--in the first volume on queer theory in education. In his perceptive introduction, the editor outlines queer theory as it is emerging in the field of education, its significance for all scholars and teachers, and its relation to queer theory in literacy theory and more generally, in the humanities.

Excerpt

[W]e live the political reality of our identity effects.

--Cindy Patton (1993, p. 175)

The preference of "queer" represents . . . an aggressive impulse of generalization;
it rejects a minoritizing logic of toleration or simple political interest repre
sentation in favor of a more thorough resistance to regimes of the normal.

--Michael Warner (1993, p. xxvi)

In a word, [queer] theory may be described as a post-Marxian left discourse
that leans in a postmodern direction yet retains much of the modernist legacy,
in particular its millennialism and vanguardism.

--Steven Seidman (1993, p. 130)

Queer speech is vague, indirect speech.

--Hubert Fichte (1996, p. 403)

Queer theory in education is not exactly new, of course. The ancient Greeks--and their successors in Rome--although not using the phrase, did link the two. The most recent visibility of queer theory is hardly an expression of nostalgia for those days of homosexuality coupled with misogyny, slavery, and elitism (Block, 1997; Pinar & Grumet, 1988). In education, it appeared in curriculum theory, that site (within the larger field of education) of intellectual revolution for the past three decades (see Pinar, Reynolds, Slattery, & Taubman, 1995, chaps. 1, 4, & 15). Although this is not the occasion for an official history, it is obligatory to mention . . .

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