Generation 1.5 Meets College Composition: Issues in the Teaching of Writing to U.S.-Educated Learners of ESL

Generation 1.5 Meets College Composition: Issues in the Teaching of Writing to U.S.-Educated Learners of ESL

Generation 1.5 Meets College Composition: Issues in the Teaching of Writing to U.S.-Educated Learners of ESL

Generation 1.5 Meets College Composition: Issues in the Teaching of Writing to U.S.-Educated Learners of ESL

Synopsis

An increasing number of students graduate from U. S. high schools and enter college while still in the process of learning English. This group--the "1.5 generation"--consisting of immigrants and U. S. residents born abroad as well as indigenous language minority groups, is rapidly becoming a major constituency in college writing programs. These students defy the existing categories in most college writing programs, and in the research literature. Experienced in American culture and schooling, they have characteristics and needs distinct from the international students who have been the subject of most research and literature on ESL writing. Furthermore, in studies of mainstream college composition, basic writing, and diversity, these students' status as second-language learners is usually left unaddressed or even misconstrued as underpreparation. Nevertheless, research and pedagogical writings have yet to take up the particular issues entailed in teaching composition to this student population. The intent in this volume is to bridge this gap and to initiate a dialogue on the linguistic, cultural, and ethical issues that attend teaching college writing to U. S.-educated linguistically diverse students.

This book is the first to address explicitly issues in the instruction of "1.5 generation" college writers. From urban New York City to midwestern land grant universities to the Pacific Rim, experienced educators and researchers discuss a variety of contexts, populations, programs, and perspectives. The 12 chapters in this collection, authored by prominent authorities in non-native language writing, are research based and conceptual, providing a research-based survey of who the students are, their backgrounds and needs, and how they are placed and instructed in a variety of settings. The authors frame issues, raise questions, and provide portraits of language minority students and the classrooms and programs that serve them.

Together, the pieces paint the landscape of college writing instruction for 1.5 generation students and explore the issues faced by ESL and college writing programs in providing appropriate writing instruction to second-language learners arriving from U. S. high schools.

This book serves not only to articulate an issue and set an agenda for further research and discussion, but also to suggest paths toward linguistic and cultural sensitivity in any writing classroom. It is thought-provoking reading for college administrators, writing teachers, and scholars and students of first- and second-language composition.

Excerpt

This book is about college writing instruction and U.S. high school graduates who enter higher education while in the process of learning English. These students, primarily immigrants and students from U.S. multilingual enclaves such as Puerto Rico, are becoming an increasing presence on college campuses across the country. the title of this volume refers to Rumbaut and Ima's (1988) characterization of these students as "1.5 generation" immigrants because of traits and experiences that lie somewhere in between those associated with the first or second generation. the initiative for the book came from our realization that although nonnative language college writers educated in the United States are becoming a major constituency in college writing programs, one that draws ready recognition from most college composition and English as a Second Language (ESL) writing instructors, there has been a dearth of research or writing about the instructional issues presented by this student population. Long-term U.S. resident English learners pose a significant challenge to the conventional categories and practices governing composition instruction at the postsecondary level. With backgrounds in U.S. culture and schooling, they are distinct from international students or other newcomers who have been the subject of most esl writing literature, while at the same time these students' status as English language learners is often treated as incidental or even misconstrued as underpreparation in writings on mainstream college composition and basic writing.

In compiling this volume, our intent is to bridge this gap and to initiate a dialogue on the linguistic, cultural, and ethical issues that attend teaching college writing to U.S. educated linguistically diverse students. the book brings together a number of experienced writing researchers and educators to identify and explore the issues. Working from an overarching perspective that casts writing and instruction as socially situated and constructed, the chapters of this book frame issues, raise questions, and provide portraits of language minority students and the classrooms and programs that serve them. From New York to midwestern land grant universities to the Pacific Rim, contributors to this volume represent a diversity of contexts, populations, programs, and perspectives. Collectively the chapters serve to characterize the shared attributes and diversity of language minority writers. Authors con-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.