Indigenous Educational Models for Contemporary Practice: In Our Mother's Voice

Indigenous Educational Models for Contemporary Practice: In Our Mother's Voice

Indigenous Educational Models for Contemporary Practice: In Our Mother's Voice

Indigenous Educational Models for Contemporary Practice: In Our Mother's Voice

Synopsis

What is the philosophy that should drive native education policy and practice? In July 1997 a group of native educational leaders from the United States (including Alaska and Hawai'i), Canada, Australia, and New Zealand gathered to define a potential solution to this question. This book passes on the individual educational philosophies of the participants and captures the essence of each in a dynamic, transformational, and holistic model--"Go to the Source"--which forwards a collective vision for a native language- and culture-based educational philosophy that native educational leaders and teachers, policymakers, and curriculum developers can use to ground their work. For more information visit http://ed-web2.educ.msu.edu/voice/

Excerpt

Valorie Johnson Cayuga-Seneca

As is customary in most Iroquois gatherings, the words that come before all else are those of giving thanks for all the gifts of life. They are usually given in the form of the Thanksgiving Address, which can often take several hours to recite. This ancient message of peace and appreciation of Mother Earth is an acknowledgment of the full circle of creation. As a tradition that is hundreds of years old, the Address is given to help us, as human beings, put our minds together as one, and learn to live in peace and harmony with one another and with Mother Earth.

So it is with that same spirit that I begin the Foreword for this book. First, I acknowledge all the gifts that have been given to human beings by the Creator, such as the water, plants, animals, stars, and all the other wonders of nature. I give thanks to those ancestors who struggled, often against great odds, to hold tightly to their beliefs that the natural world is a precious and rare gift for which we must always be thankful. They are the ones who recognized that these gifts have sustained us and made us strong, and that as human beings, we have responsibilities to protect these gifts of which we are a part. They are the ancestors who fought many types of battles to maintain the land and keep our cultures alive. They are my ancestors . . . and they are also the ancestors of many indigenous peoples around the world.

Like the Iroquois, there are many indigenous peoples who have evolved cultures over many centuries that are based on a delicate balance between . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.