Press and Public: Who Reads What, When, Where, and Why in American Newspapers

Press and Public: Who Reads What, When, Where, and Why in American Newspapers

Press and Public: Who Reads What, When, Where, and Why in American Newspapers

Press and Public: Who Reads What, When, Where, and Why in American Newspapers

Excerpt

The basis of our government being the opinion of the people, the very first object should be to keep that right; and were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.

Letter to Colonel Edward Carrington [January 16, 1787]

-- Thomas Jefferson

The importance of newspapers for a democratic society is no less than it was two centuries ago. It may be greater. The public's need for information has grown at a steadily accelerating pace as people's lives have become more complex and more interdependent. It is increasingly hard for all of us to cope with the enormous flood of communications that come our way, wanted or not.

Effective citizens must have the feeling that they can cope with events that have shape and definition and that they understand. The very profusion of . . .

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