The Treatise against Hermogenes

The Treatise against Hermogenes

The Treatise against Hermogenes

The Treatise against Hermogenes

Synopsis

A monumental project which brings the English-speaking work key selections from the remarkable literature of early Christianity -- vertiable trasures of Christian faith and theology in superb translations.

Excerpt

Hermogenes had first lived in the eastern part of the Empire, perhaps at Antioch: this supposition derives from the fact that Theophilus of Antioch had composed a special refutation of his doctrine in which, according to Eusebius, this apologist 'had made use of quotations from the Apocalypse of St. John.' Later Hermogenes settled in Carthage, where he exercised the profession of painter. He was still living when Tertullian wrote the Adversus Hermogenem; a second treatise directed against him, the De censu animaæ adversus Hermogenem, was probably written a few years later.

For our knowledge of the doctrine of Hermogenes the chief sources are Hippolytus, Elenchos 8.17 and 10.28, the present treatise, and the quotations from, and allusions to, the De censu animae which occur in the De anima. Less important are three passages in other works of Tertullian (Adv. Valent. 16 and De praescr. haer. 30-12 ff. and 33.9), Theodoret, Haer. fab. comp. 1.19, Filastrius, De haer. 44, and St. Augustine, De haer. 41.

With regard to the data furnished by the present treatise, it should be kept in mind that Tertullian is by no means always a reliable authority for the doctrines of his opponents: frequently he records their arguments in a distorted form which makes it easier either to refute or to ridicule them; moreover, for the sake of his argument he now and then makes them say things which at the best they . . .

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