Utopia with the Dialogue of Comfort

Utopia with the Dialogue of Comfort

Read FREE!

Utopia with the Dialogue of Comfort

Utopia with the Dialogue of Comfort

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The Papal system did not become extinct in England without having breathed a swan-song; the devotion of an illustrious adherent showed in what a saintly spirit an Englishman could hold the ancient faith -- what truth, sincerity, stedfastness of mind, could be drawn out in that cause. No wonder that a man of such virtues should have been considered as a martyr by monks, that he should have been included by Stapleton among the "three Thomases--Aquinas, à Becket, and More." Had all been like him the. Church would not have fallen; his life no less than his death left a beautiful gleam, like a bar of crimson light at sunset, on the close of the Papistical era of English history. And now that the Puritan phase is passing away for ever--that the cause which overcame in the olden time is, through the indifferentism of adherents, inevitably being merged into new historical transformations-- it is not useless to cast a retrospective glance on the last days of an ancient system, and to see in how noble a manner English Papism fell in the person of Sir Thomas More, knight, once of the royal council and Lord Chancellor of England. One of the noblest impersonations of the honest English spirit, he was a vir justus ac tenax propositi; too religious to tamper with his convictions, too much attached to the past to worship the rising sun, and therefore doomed to be ruined if he entered the vortex of theological change. His most intimate friend was cautious, those around him were obedient to the new state of things; for him, sincere enthusiast of the conquered cause, earthly prosperity was to be shortened; but had it been otherwise, history would have lost one of its brightest examples; in those days of Machiavellian overreaching, More's death was a protest against insincerity. And what redounds to the especial honour of England in that age is the fact, that while Sir Thomas More is true to the fallen cause, the King is equally straightforward and uncompromising in his own sphere of action. There was no treachery in Henry's character; hence . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.