The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: Including a Journal of His Tour to the Hebrides - Vol. 3

The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: Including a Journal of His Tour to the Hebrides - Vol. 3

Read FREE!

The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: Including a Journal of His Tour to the Hebrides - Vol. 3

The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: Including a Journal of His Tour to the Hebrides - Vol. 3

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Boswell revisits London -- Peter Garrica -- "Taxation no Tyranny" -- Dr. Tower's "Answer" -- Gerard Hamilton -- Sheridan's Gold Medal to home -- Mrs. Abington -- Cibber's "Nonjuror" -- Boswell's "Surveillance" -- Garrick's Prologues -- The Adams -- Garrick's Imitations of Johnson -- Gray's Odes -- Lord Chesterfield's Letters -- Johnson's Diploma of LL.D. -- Abyssinian Bruce -- Coleman's "Odes to Obscurity and Oblivion." -- Mason's "Elfrida," and "Caractacus" -- The Bath-Easton Vase -- Fleet Street and Charing Cross.

ON Tuesday, 21st March, I arrived in London; and on repairing to Dr. Johnson's before dinner, found him in his study, sitting with Mr. Peter Garrick, the elder brother of David, strongly resembling him in countenance and voice, but of more sedate and placid manners. Johnson informed me, that though Mr. Beauclerk was in great pain, it was hoped he was not in danger, and that he now wished to consult Dr. Heberden, to try the effect of a "new understanding." Both at this interview, and in the evening at Mr. Thrale's, where he and Mr. Peter Garrick and I met again, he was vehement on the subject of the Ossian controversy; observing, "We do not know that there are any ancient Erse manuscripts; and we have no other reason to disbelieve that there are men with three heads, but that we do not know that there are any such men." He also was outrageous upon his supposition that my countrymen "loved Scotland better than truth," saying, "All of them, -- nay not all, -- but droves of them, would come up, and attest anything for the honour of Scotland." He also persevered in his wild allegation, that he questioned if there was a tree between Edinburgh and the English border older than himself. I assured him he was mistaken, and suggested that the proper punishment would be that he should receive a stripe at every tree above a hundred years old, that was found within that space. He laughed, and said, "I believe I might submit to it for a baubee."

The doubts which, in my correspondence with him, I had ven-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.