Economic Issues in Metropolitan Growth: Papers Presented at a Forum Conducted by Resources for the Future May 28-29, 1975 in Washington, D.C

Economic Issues in Metropolitan Growth: Papers Presented at a Forum Conducted by Resources for the Future May 28-29, 1975 in Washington, D.C

Economic Issues in Metropolitan Growth: Papers Presented at a Forum Conducted by Resources for the Future May 28-29, 1975 in Washington, D.C

Economic Issues in Metropolitan Growth: Papers Presented at a Forum Conducted by Resources for the Future May 28-29, 1975 in Washington, D.C

Excerpt

During the summer of 1973, Resources for the Future applied to the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation for a grant to extend its research in the area of "government structure and process as they relate to environmental quality, resources use, and economic growth." This area of research had come to be explored at RFF because of the strong feeling of Allen V. Kneese and Edwin T. Haefele (at that time directors of the Quality of the Environment and Regional and Urban Studies programs, respectively) that misunderstandings about the way collective choices were actually made lay at the heart of many environmental and urban problems. These feelings had led to a modest research effort at RFF in the area of collective decision making in the several years previous to the grant application. From this research came the attempt by Haefele, Clifford S. Russell, and Walter O. Spofford to introduce political constraints -- in addition to the more familiar technological and economic constraints -- into their comprehensive model of residuals management in the Delaware River Basin. These efforts were expanded subsequent to the Clark Foundation award of a three-year $300,000 grant.

The first and partial product of that grant was The Governance of Common Property Resources, edited byHaefele and published byRFF late in 1974. The papers in that volume dealt with the political, economic, and legal problems which attend resources that are publicly owned and managed (and subject, therefore, to a variety of competing claims for their use) or those which are not owned at all. The scope of the papers was wide, ranging from the management of wilderness lands and natural park areas to the legitimacy of producers groups in the political and legislative processes.

This volume, the second produced under the Clark grant, focuses on the problems of metropolitan areas, thereby extending yet narrowing the earlier work. This focus was chosen for two reasons: first, although . . .

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