Traditional Food East and West of the Pennines

Traditional Food East and West of the Pennines

Traditional Food East and West of the Pennines

Traditional Food East and West of the Pennines

Excerpt

People who take a great interest in the food history of their own region are often much less aware of the traditional cuisine that has grown up just beyond the borders of their special area. For people in the north of England, the Pennine peaks are a barrier. Crops and climate are not dissimilar on either side (even if the west can claim the higher rainfall). But local regional dishes have been developed, often based on similar types of produce, which are far from uniform and have taken on their own characteristics within the individual northern counties.

When we were planning the Third Leeds Symposium on Food History and Traditions we thought it would be interesting to consider some of these developments and the reasons for them within the Pennine counties of Lancashire, Yorkshire, and Cumberland and Westmorland (now Cumbria). Had the Symposium been longer than a one-day affair, we would have wanted to include also the northern and southern 'border' counties, Cheshire and Derbyshire to the south, and the Tees and Tyne valleys to the north-east. But because we wished to look at the traditional foods within a wider context we had to limit our area on this occasion, and to hope that a future Symposium meeting can explore the foodways of those other Pennine areas.

For centuries the oldest recipes, in northern England as elsewhere, were passed on from mother to daughter, with . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.