The Life of John Wesley

The Life of John Wesley

The Life of John Wesley

The Life of John Wesley

Excerpt

A word of justification is due from any one who presumes to add another to the already numerous Lives of John Wesley.

The early biographers -- -except Southey -- and most of the later ones have written as Methodists for Methodists. With that great religious movement of which Wesley was the leader, I have the most hearty sympathy; but I have endeavored to consider his work without narrowing denominational bias, and have emphasized certain important phases of his character that have often received comparatively little attention. Wesley was, indeed, primarily the religious reformer; but he is surely to be remembered not merely as the Methodist, but as the man, -- a marked and striking personality, energetic, scholarly, alive to all moral, social, and political questions, and for some thirty years probably exerting a greater influence than any other man in England. I have ventured to hope that the story of such a life, told in moderate compass, may still be of interest to the general reader as well as to the student of religious history.

I am, of course, indebted to the older Lives of Wesley by Clarke, Watson, Moore, and Southey, and to the later ones by Stevens, Lelièvre, Overton, and Telford; while the laborious and monumental . . .

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