The Kennedy Circle

The Kennedy Circle

The Kennedy Circle

The Kennedy Circle

Excerpt

A new member of the President's cabinet arriving in Washington first sends his wife out to look for a house big enough for the entertaining soon to be demanded of him, and then he goes down to his office and bravely and hopefully enters into American history. He also enters a government department that is well aware it was there before he came and will be there when he is gone-- where oil portraits of great secretaries from the past look querulously out from gilt frames seeing him, sitting there behind a ponderous desk and chromium water pitcher, wondering how to get control of an agency filled with people who know more about it than he does.

While he reflects on this, his wife telephones to say the really suitable houses are in Spring Valley and Wesley Heights, but they have racial covenants. While nothing really has been said, it is somehow understood that nobody in this administration may sign a covenant. He asks her to look down in Georgetown. A lot of the other fellows are moving in there, where the houses are quaint, if cramped, and while those with three small bedrooms begin around $60,000, they at least don't have covenants.

Now to try to see just what this agency he has been appointed to run is all about. One of President Kennedy's appointees tried to learn this by calling in his bureau heads and asking each one . . .

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