English Social Differences

English Social Differences

English Social Differences

English Social Differences

Excerpt

That in England to-day there are important social differences is obvious to anyone who lives here, and to visitors. To our guests, the differences are striking and puzzling: most natives tend to take them for granted. They are much more effective in some localities than in others.

This book deals with England only. Perhaps it may stimulate someone to attempt a picture, on similar lines, of Scotland, Wales, Northern and Southern Ireland and the Channel Islands. It would be a valuable help in the assessment of the famous 'British Character'.

The subject has been approached from the social psychologist's standpoint. To demarcate social psychology from sociology is, however, so difficult that I have gladly availed myself of writings by and advice from several sociologists.

The chapter headings and arrangement of the themes inevitably reflect personal interests. In dealing with concepts, I have tried to represent fairly the views of contemporary students of society. My own opinion may perhaps be mentioned: that the concepts of stratum, status and élite may be more useful than that of class in studying many social problems today, and while certain strata are noticeably class-implicated, others are not.

All sciences begin as 'natural history'. In this phase, likenesses and differences between phenomena are noted and named, to further the development of a stage of knowledge in which, on the basis of recorded, classified facts, tentative generalisations can be made, and tested by experience or experiment. Yet in the early stage of any science, 'laws' may be based prematurely upon insufficient data. Some psychologists and sociologists seem a little too eager to generalise. Often when reading that 'people' act, think or feel in certain ways, one reflects that this assertion may be true chiefly or only about the writer's own social milieu. Articles have been written about "the miners", as if they, as a class, are in constant close touch with fellow workers in distant areas, yet reports by those who . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.