The Demand for Housing in Racially Mixed Areas: A Study of the Nature of Neighborhood Change

The Demand for Housing in Racially Mixed Areas: A Study of the Nature of Neighborhood Change

The Demand for Housing in Racially Mixed Areas: A Study of the Nature of Neighborhood Change

The Demand for Housing in Racially Mixed Areas: A Study of the Nature of Neighborhood Change

Excerpt

It is our hope that this volume will shed some light on what is undoubtedly the most perplexing and compelling domestic problem of America at mid-century--the effort to assure full citizenship rights for all members of our society. In essence this study is primarily an analysis of some of the major forces at work in racially mixed neighborhoods, but it also attempts to probe into the nature and ultimate outcome of the transition process. This problem has been of growing importance, particularly in the cities of the North, as the Negro population has increased, often faster than the white, and as large numbers of Negroes have acquired residences in previously all-white areas.

The analysis of racial change is approached from the point of view of the housing market--the mechanism through which transition occurs. The residential pattern, however, obviously has implications that go beyond questions of housing alone. Racial concentration of residences affects the composition of schools, churches, community centers, and other activities that are organized on a neighborhood basis. But perhaps more important is the fact that segregated peoples do not have the opportunity to experience neighborly contacts, share community facilities, and participate in the solution of common problems. It is these types of interactions that develop mutual understanding and provide the true path to an integrated community.

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