Nature and Nurture, Part I: Their Influence upon Intelligence

Nature and Nurture, Part I: Their Influence upon Intelligence

Nature and Nurture, Part I: Their Influence upon Intelligence

Nature and Nurture, Part I: Their Influence upon Intelligence

Excerpt

The Yearbook on Nature and Nurture has grown out of a suggestion made by Dr. L. M. Terman in December, 1923, that the Society might profitably initiate some research on the limitations of educability, might help to answer the question whether educational effort can or can not make bright children out of dull ones. The Executive Committee of the Society, at a meeting held at Detroit, January, 1924, acted favorably upon the suggestion and requested Dr. Terman, in collaboration with Dr. Bagley, to select a suitable committee to undertake the work. In April, 1924, the plans were formally endorsed and a Committee appointed to produce a Yearbook on the "Possibilities and Limitations of Training." Further development of the plans has been set before the Society already (for example, in the 24th Yearbook, Part II, pp. 386-8, and in the 25th Yearbook, Part II, pp. 254-6). The change of title of the Yearbook itself does not, of course, involve any essential change in the subject matter dealt with by the Committee during the four years the work has been under way.

The Board of Directors appropriated for the expenses of this Yearbook Committee $700 in April, 1924, $600 in October, 1925, and a special fund of $500 in February, 1927. These sums, however, represent only a fraction of the money expended in procuring the data that follow. Four of the major contributions--the Chicago and Stanford investigations of foster children (Chapters IX and X of Part I), the Hollingworth-Cobb investigation (Chapter I of Part II), and the Heilman investigation (Chapter II of Part II)--have been facilitated by grants from the Commonwealth Fund, from Mr. Max Rosenberg, from Stanford University, from the Institute of Educational Research of Teachers College, from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, from the Colorado State Teachers College, and from the Denver Public Schools. The Society expresses its appreciation of these contributions; explicit acknowledgment of them is made elsewhere in these volumes. Many other organizations and institutions have also assisted us, especially through permitting their representatives to devote their time and energy to the gathering of data and preparation of contributions. If these contributions and the personal efforts of the numerous . . .

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