The Development of West Indies Cricket - Vol. 2

The Development of West Indies Cricket - Vol. 2

The Development of West Indies Cricket - Vol. 2

The Development of West Indies Cricket - Vol. 2

Synopsis

This volume covers the "third rising" of West Indies cricket. As the sport becomes ever more commercialized, large amounts of money have established sponsorship and support systems to give cricketers around the world every possible advantage. Beckles assesses what impact the globalization of cricket has had on the cricketers of the Caribbean. He also describes the emergence of what he argues is a debilitating sub-nationalism in the West Indies, and the effect this has had on the game, and the prospect for integrating West Indian nationhood in the twenty-first century.

Excerpt

Books, like living organisms, can generally claim an origin within a process of double parenting; the author is but one parent. The other, the external intervention, can come in diverse forms, ranging from a moving experience of a public event to a personal, though not private, intellectual request. In this case the co-creator was the stimulation endemic to some five years of intense cricket dialogue with Michael Manley. Very few of us who have been associated with Michael knew how to resist the compelling passion and spirit within his cultured voice. The comrade was a master craftsman of the effective tone, and the decision to write this book came as an eruptive capitulation somewhere in the midst of a seemingly unending debate. He insisted, as was his nature to do, that I owed it to him, C.L.R. James, Learie Constantine, the cricket fraternity and society at large, to place a text on the rapidly changing field of play in order to facilitate focused discourse on the evolving third paradigm of West Indies cricket and society in the era of globalization. I promised that an effort would be made and secured the assurance that he would write a foreword. We had an agreement; it was broken by the untimely intervention of nature, but the text, as he would have also insisted, had to go on.

It was clear to me in 1992 from the topics of our discussions that Michael had wished to assess and comment on the issues that inform this book. He was keen to devise a discursive system to interface West Indies politics, society and economics, so as to facilitate public understanding of cricket's encounter with the postmodern challenges of globalization. The third paradigm, West Indies cricket and global society, was upon us, he argued, but the discourse still required precise definition, conceptual terms of reference, and ideological clarity. He knew what was to be said and done. The revised second edition of his magisterial A History of West Indies Cricket was the beginning of this project, but he knew only too well that a major conceptual . . .

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