The Pathos of Distance: A Book of a Thousand and One Moments

The Pathos of Distance: A Book of a Thousand and One Moments

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The Pathos of Distance: A Book of a Thousand and One Moments

The Pathos of Distance: A Book of a Thousand and One Moments

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The time has passed when a novel of Mr. George Moore is anathema to the householder in Suburbia. Indeed, some Philistines have recognised in his work a distinctly moral flavour. Such a humanitarian tale as Esther Waters , not- withstanding its condemnation by the London book stalls, has been acclaimed a victory for law and order. To-day many of Mr. Moore's admirers, possibly the author himself, find the moral stress in this book rather too obvious. But to the delight of the unregenerate who love literature quâ literature, Esther Waters was followed by Celibates, the very quintessence of Mooreishness. This volume contained one story that would have made the reputation of a half dozen "big sellers" among latter-day novelists. I refer to Mildred Lawson, of which the late Henry Harland remarked that it was worthy of Flaubert if it had been written in good English. The American novelist was more witty than truthful, for Mildred Lawson contains some of Mr. Moore's most notable achievements in prose, a fact that did not escape the eye of Mr. Harry Thurston Peck . . .

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