The Repressor of over Much Blaming of the Clergy - Vol. 1

The Repressor of over Much Blaming of the Clergy - Vol. 1

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The Repressor of over Much Blaming of the Clergy - Vol. 1

The Repressor of over Much Blaming of the Clergy - Vol. 1

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The life of Reginald Pecock has been made the subject of a special work by Lewis,1 who has conscientiously and laboriously (if not very skilfully) put together almost everything of importance which can. now be learned respecting him. The actual facts, however, admit of being stated tolerably briefly.

Pecock's early life, circa A.D. 1395-1430.

His parentage is unknown, as well as the exact time and place of his birth. He must have been born, however, about the end of the fourteenth century, and is said by Gascoigne, Leland, and others to have been a Welshman; he is styled, moreover, in a papal instrument, presbyter diæceses Menevensis.1 He appears, therefore, to have sprung from the northern district of the principality comprised within the diocese of St. David's, and contiguous to the parts which he afterwards governed upon being promoted to the bishopric of St. Ssaph.1 His boyhood was spent in his own country, and many of its years were doubtless (as Wood, perhaps following Gascoigne, asserts) well spent in the acquisition of grammatical learning. He thence went to Oriel College, Oxford, and was elected to a fellowship October 30, 1417, upon the vacancy occasioned by the elevation of Dr. Garsdale to the office of provost of the College. He was ordained acolyte and subdeacon by his diocesan, Dr. Flemmyng, Bishop of Lincoln, on the same day, December 21, 1420; admitted to deacon's orders February 15, 1421, and to priest's orders March 8 the same year, upon the title, of his College fellowship. He soon afterwards proceeded to the degree of bachelor in divinity, and incepted under a Cistercian monk, whose name has not come down to us, about the year 1425,2 when Gascoigne was Chancellor of the University. His studies had been unwearied both in sacred and profane literature, and, his very enemies being judges, were crowned with complete success "Felicia, hæc principia (says Leland) tales habuere . . .

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