The Apologye of Syr Thomas More, Knyght

The Apologye of Syr Thomas More, Knyght

The Apologye of Syr Thomas More, Knyght

The Apologye of Syr Thomas More, Knyght

Excerpt

If Sir Thomas More could be given the enviable privilege of rewriting his Apology in the light of the criticisms of four centuries, he would make of it a very different book. Some of the criticisms to which, in 1533, he felt bound to reply he could now afford to ignore; on the other hand, one criticism that he then thought unworthy of notice he would find recurring later with a frequency that demanded an answer. I refer to the charge of inconsistency, which since the latter part of the seventeenth century has been repeatedly brought against his political or religious views, or, more broadly, against his entire life. Though this criticism is most familiar in the balanced phrases of the modern historians who have given it currency, it appeared in its earliest form shortly after More had written his first controversial work. To Tyndale Sir Thomas More was one who 'knew the truth, and . . . forsook it again'. In fact, before Tyndale had written a dozen pages of his Answer he found occasion to twit his opponent with the Encomium Moriæ, and to remind his readers that the book was written in More's house by 'his darling Erasmus'. If this book 'were in English,' Tyndale continues, 'then should every man see how that he [More] then was far otherwise minded than he now writeth.' Though More did not regard this charge as worthy of notice in his final defence of his controversial works, he had been compelled by the very method of his Confutation to reply to it there. Quoting Tyndale's words, he comments as follows: 'If this be true, then the more cause have I to thank God of amendment. But surely this is [un]true. For, God be thanked! I never had . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.