The Recorder: Its Traditions and Its Tasks

The Recorder: Its Traditions and Its Tasks

The Recorder: Its Traditions and Its Tasks

The Recorder: Its Traditions and Its Tasks

Excerpt

Ever since the reconstruction of recorders and other historical instruments began in the early part of this century, as part of the movement devoted to the authentic performance of early music, the recorder has become especially popular and is played by an ever increasing number of enthusiasts. It has acquired so many adherents in amateur and professional circles alike that it is impossible to conceive contemporary musical life without it. As, however, the tradition of recorder playing, which had been interrupted for over 150 years, has not been revived simultaneously, fundamental practical problems of performance have remained unsolved.

Today this development has reached the stage where the helping hand of musicology is urgently needed. In particular, questions of ornamentation and instrumentation need clarifying in addition to constructional and technical questions. The task of the present work is therefore to provide, with the help of the relevant sources, an insight into the structural and acoustic principles of the instrument and its methods of performance (blowing and fingering, articulation, ornamentation and scoring) during the period from 1450--1750.

As it is important, in this connection, to deal as well with the present state of recorder playing, a concluding chapter describes the contemporary instruction books, compositions specialty written for, and the tasks of the instrument.

Dr. Hildemarie Peter . . .

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