Aristotle Dictionary

Aristotle Dictionary

Aristotle Dictionary

Aristotle Dictionary

Excerpt

The writings attributed to Aristotle have been classified according to three historical periods:

A. While under the direct influence of the Academy (367-347 B.C.). This is evident from both content and form (the dialogue). He wrote The Eudemus, or On The Soul, in which he admits Plato's doctrine of reminiscence, the prior existence of the soul and his proofs of the immortality of the soul, as well as the existence of Idea-Forms. The Protrepticus appears to have been a letter to Themison of Cyprus or a treatise dedicated to him extolling the life of the philosopher. This may have been a model for Cicero's Hortensius, which created such an enthusiasm in the young Augustine for the intellectual life. It is said that the first 27 volumes in the catalogue of the works of Aristotle given by Diogenes Laertius are in dialogue form and belon to this and the succeeding period. Those which appear to be notes on Platonic dialogues are definitely in this period; others, such as the On Philosophy appear to be later. Some of the titles are: On Justice, On Poets, Politicus, Gryllus (on Rhetoric), Statesman, Sophist, Eroticus, Symposium, On Riches, Menexenus. It is probable that parts of the Organon and the Physics and, perhaps, Book 3 of the De Anima were written at this time.

B. During his stay at Assos, Mitylene and at the court of Philip of Macedon. This is considered by some to be the period of his own personal development in a direction away . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.