Education and the Handicapped, 1760-1960

Education and the Handicapped, 1760-1960

Education and the Handicapped, 1760-1960

Education and the Handicapped, 1760-1960

Excerpt

'The Author will not be so uncandid as to offer any Apology for the appearance of the following pages.' Thus in 1834 did James Gall open his Preface to A Historical Sketch of the Origin and Progress of Literature for the Blind. His sentiments are echoed here. But even if no apology is offered thanks are.

It is with pleasure that I record my gratitude to those who have assisted me in many ways. Mr. E. Keates of the School for the Blind, Liverpool, and Mr. J. R. Waddington of the Victoria Settlement, Liverpool, both made unpublished papers available for my inspection. Miss P. Smith gave me information concerning the Invalid Children's Aid Association, and Mr. W. King, Principal of St. Loyes College, Exeter, supplied me with notes on which my reference to Dame Georgiana Buller is based. The staffs of the Picton Library, Liverpool, the Library of the Department of Education of the Deaf, Manchester, and the Public Record Office, London, have been most helpful. Miss P. M. Downie, Chief Librarian of the Ministry of Education, Mrs. S. L. Coghill, Librarian of the Royal National Institute for the Blind, and Dr. P. P. Gorman, Librarian of the Royal National Institute for the Deaf, drew to my attention various sources of information. Mr. H. A. Hewitt, Departmental Records Officer of the Ministry of Education, helped me to trace files relating to early special schools, and my colleague, Mr. O. M. V. Argles, Tutor- Librarian of the Institute of Education, performed a similar service in relation to books. Mr. Argles, Dr. J. Murphy, of the University of Liverpool, and my wife read the manuscript in whole or in part and made valuable suggestions. My wife also undertook the unenviable task of translating my handwriting into typescript. To all of these I express my thanks.

During the nineteenth century and part of the twentieth the children now known as physically handicapped and educationally sub-normal were termed physically defective and mentally defective; the schools that they and the blind and the deaf attended were frequently called institutions; the education they received bore the name . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.