Economic Development and Tribal Change: A Study of Immigrant Labour in Buganda

Economic Development and Tribal Change: A Study of Immigrant Labour in Buganda

Economic Development and Tribal Change: A Study of Immigrant Labour in Buganda

Economic Development and Tribal Change: A Study of Immigrant Labour in Buganda

Excerpt

This report contains the results of a study of immigrant labour in Uganda carried out by the East African Institute of Social Research during 1950 and 1951 at the request of the Government of Uganda.Proposals for such a study were made in the first instance by Dr. W. H. Stanner, the first Director of the Institute, who gave a high priority to this investigation in a programme of research which he prepared for the Colonial Social Science Research Council in 1949.1 The inquiry, as he then envisaged it, was to be entirely concentrated on the migration of men and women from Ruanda-Urundi--the socalled Banyaruanda2 --into Uganda since the health and general conditions of the labour coming from Belgian territories had long given concern to their own Governments as well as to that of Uganda. Dr. Stanner's proposed investigation was planned on a large scale. It was to last three to five years and to be carried out by a staff of two fulltime anthropologists, one agricultural scientist, one economist, three medical research workers, one demographer and a director and editor of the joint report that was to be produced.Dr. Stanner was not able to put his proposals into effect owing to his resignation at the end of the year but, at the request of the Uganda Government, he returned to the Protectorate in March, 1950, in company with Professor I. Schapera to draw up a more modest scheme for a preliminary investigation into the economic and social effects of the migration of Ruanda. These two anthropologists recommended that the Government should organise a two-year inquiry into the problem, and that it should consist of three parts:

a. an analysis of existing statistics dealing with the extent of immigration of Ruanda into Uganda and their settlement in the Protectorate;

b. a history of migration from Ruanda-Urundi from the beginning of the century to the present day, to be undertaken by an economic historian;

c. sociological studies of the effects of the absorption of migrants from Ruanda-Urundi into different tribal areas of Uganda, to be carried out by two anthropologists who were to work in South Uganda, i.e. in Buganda and Busoga.3

The first part of the inquiry was initiated by the Government of Uganda in April, 1950, when Mr. and Mrs. Sofer (Miss Ross), Colonial Social Research Fellows, who later became members of the staff of the . . .

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