The Junior High School

The Junior High School

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The Junior High School

The Junior High School

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Every new movement in education, if it is to succeed at all, must pass through two critical stages of development before it can find its proper place. The first stage is that in which the new movement struggles for recognition by educators and by the public. The second stage is that in which approval has been won, but actual practice is incomplete, and the character or status of the new movement is still to be established. The success or failure of the movement may be determined at either of these stages.

There is abundant evidence that the junior-high-school movement has passed successfully the first stage of its development. Though little more than a decade has passed since its real beginning, it has met with general approval throughout the country. The question now is not so much whether the junior high school shall be recognized as a part of our public-school system, but what sort of a junior high school shall be established and what sort of an education shall be provided therein. Hundreds of junior high schools established in almost all parts of the country testify to the fact that the new institution has met with general approval. They also testify, however, to the fact that those responsible for the organization of junior high schools differ widely in their conceptions as to what such schools should be.

The present is a time when the junior-high-school movement is in a very critical stage of its development. It is a time when the form of reorganization is found in hundreds . . .

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