Administration and Economic Development in India

Administration and Economic Development in India

Administration and Economic Development in India

Administration and Economic Development in India

Excerpt

The development of growth economics as an autonomy which in the abstract can be detached from the tissue of culture has been much more rapid than similar developments in administration. Economic development has been blocked to a large extent precisely because its implementation depends on a structure and disposition of bureaucracy, neither of which can be jarred out of the larger societal whole.

In the spring of 1960 a group of social scientists presented papers on the manifold relationships of economic development and administration in India at sessions of the joint seminar of the Duke University Commonwealth-Studies Center. The papers presented in the seminar by Professors Mitra, Malenbaum, Sovani, and Park appear in this volume. Shri S. B. Bapat, Director of the United Nations Technical Assistance Program and Dr. I. G. Patel, of the International Monetary Fund, participated informally in the seminar. Six additional papers, written during months following the seminar by Professors Braibanti, Jagota, Tilman, Spengler, and Tinker also appear in this volume. While each paper is a separately conceived essay with no particular unity as to methodology, all focus on the problem of development in both its economic and administrative dimensions.

The range of experience from which the authors can draw their observations includes study and teaching in India, Burma, Malaya, Israel, Pakistan, Ethiopia, Japan, Okinawa, Thailand, Vietnam, Singapore, and Taiwan. The essays fall roughly into two groups: the first primarily concerned with administrative problems are, with one exception, written by political scientists. Ralph Braibanti, Professor of Political Science at Duke University, who was in Pakistan from 1960 to 1962 as Chief Advisor of the Civil Service Academy, analyzes the total structure of administrative reform, surveys the potential dangers which India avoided constructing this program, and reviews the transformation of the Indian Administrative Service as the successor to the Indian Civil Service. S. P. Jagota, Professor of Constitutional Law and Political Theory at the National Academy of Administration of India, describes the training of government of-

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