The Tradition of Freedom: Selections from the Writers Who Shaped the Traditional Concepts of Freedom and Justice in America

The Tradition of Freedom: Selections from the Writers Who Shaped the Traditional Concepts of Freedom and Justice in America

The Tradition of Freedom: Selections from the Writers Who Shaped the Traditional Concepts of Freedom and Justice in America

The Tradition of Freedom: Selections from the Writers Who Shaped the Traditional Concepts of Freedom and Justice in America

Excerpt

America was to be the land of the free. Freedom requires that the minds of free men must range the country of the intellect; and that men shall live together according to arrangements that promote the intercourse of the mind. So America was to be the society of the dialogue, the State that advances through discussions to which the ideas and criticisms of every citizen are welcome.

The United States is therefore always a new nation. It is as different now from the nation brought forth in 1776 as that Republic was different from the European nations it revolted against. The citizens of the Republic who seek today to secure freedom and justice to America discover that traditional doctrines must be expanded or reinterpreted to deal with the problems of an industrial, urban, massed society.

In 1957 the Fund for the Republic turned to an examination of freedom and justice in modern America. We aimed at a dialectical clarification of the issues that have to be resolved if freedom and justice are to be served by huge industrial corporations and trade unions, by massive political parties and media of communication, by big government, and by the church in the modern state. We knew such a clarification could not rest upon a simple reaffirmation of the ideas of the founding fathers. We knew as well that the ideas of the founding fathers were fundamental to the development of the United States. We wanted to carry on the kind of discussion we might expect the founding fathers to engage in, if they were convened again, and confronted with the problems of our time. We knew we could not conduct such a discussion without having before us the thoughts of the wisest men of the past, both those that informed the founders, and those of the founders themselves.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.