Cabinet Government and War, 1890-1940

Cabinet Government and War, 1890-1940

Cabinet Government and War, 1890-1940

Cabinet Government and War, 1890-1940

Excerpt

This book comprises the Lees Knowles lectures delivered at Cambridge in 1957; and I must express my deep gratitude to the Master and Fellows of Trinity for inviting me to give them. It represents an attempt to consider one aspect of recent constitutional history as a whole. For the development of a national system of defence in this century has been of great importance not only to the conduct of war but also to the conduct of government, in an age in which war has played so prominent a part. And while the former process has been examined on various occasions, and in some detail, the latter has not been looked at so closely for its effect on an historical constitutional tradition.

Yet that effect has been significant. The two World Wars are prominent among the factors, responsible for transforming the range and nature of British government over the past fifty years -- at the least, they have set the pace and the exact form of a development that otherwise might have come about differently. The problems and conditions may often have been remote from those of peace; the experience gained, and the methods adopted, irrelevant to peacetime needs. But the machinery of administration, and administration itself, appear differently as a result. At the close of the nineteenth century, the system of central government could virtually ignore the demands of war, and was still not attuned in many respects to the implications of an industrial society. It has since had to take the former fully into account, and in . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.