Early Adolescence: Perspectives on Research, Policy, and Intervention

Early Adolescence: Perspectives on Research, Policy, and Intervention

Early Adolescence: Perspectives on Research, Policy, and Intervention

Early Adolescence: Perspectives on Research, Policy, and Intervention

Synopsis

This volume brings together a broad group of scholars from a diverse array of disciplines to write integratively about cutting-edge research issues pertinent to various facets of the study of early adolescence. All contributors speak to the idea of interdisciplinary integration as a means of advancing knowledge in particular focus areas of early adolescence; all approach their topic with an orientation to integrating levels of organization. In so doing, they testify to the importance of two interrelated integrations -- multidisciplinary and multiprofessional -- for furthering understanding of young adolescents.

Excerpt

Anne C. Petersen The University of Minnesota

This volume represents a major accomplishment both for scholars of early adolescence at (or related to) Penn State and for the field. For those at Penn State, it represents a multiyear effort to engage about 80 scholars from across disciplines who came together from five colleges and 21 departments. With funding from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, five working groups began in 1989 to focus on education, families, health and health promotion, media, and preventive interventions for young adolescents.

The breadth of this effort required the inevitable challenges of communicating across disciplines. In addition, many of these scholars had not previously studied early adolescence. To complicate things further, we also included in our discussions scholars with expertise on youth from beyond the United States, policy analysts and policymakers, and practitioners. The result was an exciting mix of new ideas that culminated, in part, in the contributions found in this volume.

our rationale for this broad and potentially high-risk approach was that the overall field of research on early adolescence had been developing rapidly but largely within disciplinary boundaries. Further, some areas such as education for young adolescents were developed to a much greater extent than others, such as media effects. Finally, as is typically the case, there had been insufficient interaction about issues related to early adolescence among researchers, policymakers, and practitioners, depriving research of knowledge about the most important questions, and depriving practitioners and policymakers of current knowledge . . .

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